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. we'll follow the story again in the weeks ahead. we will turn our attention to a special election in south carolina. also, what is next on the immigration debate. mark murray of nbc news is going to be joining us. a new report out by the national consortium for the study of terrorism in response to terrorism. have thought about terrorism in the last week than they thought about hospitalization or violent crime. we will talk about that with bill braniff from university of maryland. all of the sunday shows can be heard on c-span radio. the events in boston and immigration topping the list. nancy, good morning. >> the main focus of today's talk shows, the events this week in boston, and fallout from those events. rears program's beginning at noon beginning with "meet the press." and richard durbin clarke. at 2:00 p.m., here fox news sunday. chris wallace talks with the chairman of the senate intelligence committee. senator dianne feinstein, also republican representative peter king and former cia director michael hayden. candy crowley welcomes homeland security chairman representativ
, elected official, law enforcement, they really present us with a set of complex questions. and above all, though, i have to repeat that the justice department, our federal united states department of justice, has the responsibility to enforce the controlled substances act. and that remains unchanged. to -- no state, no executive can nullify a statute that's been passed by congress. as the department of justice has noted, though, federal drug enforcement resources -- just like i did as a police chief -- we prioritize and target the serious crimes. serious crimes of drug dealing, violent crime and trafficking. and let's be clear that law enforcement officials take an oath of office to uphold federal law, and they're going to continue to pursue drug traffickers and drug dealers and transnational criminal organizations, all of which weaken our communities, and they pose very serious threats to our nation. and too often discussions about marijuana, though, dwell on this issue of legalization and whether making the drug more widely and easily available -- which it would be when it becomes lega
members who voted the other way today and perhaps in the next election to challenge them. bring the issue forward to the american people. this is worth the fight. we have got to stand up to bring sensible gun safety to america. god forbid what tomorrow's victims will be, but we know they will be there. we have to do everything we can to spare another family from this agree. thank you. let me salute all of my andeagues, particularly joe the families who have lit a candle. that is a hard, hard thing to do when you go through what they went through. you do not want to get out of bed, let alone come here and argue truth to power, which you have done. it will not be forgotten. it will be helpful. mistruth, brute, political force won out over what is right. america will be a less safe place because of it. i say to the families, i say to the american people, many cannot understand what is happening here in this capital. don't give up faith. things change quickly in washington. they have changed for gay marriage. they are changing for immigration. they will change for gun safety sooner than you t
elections, especially like those in 2012, it's very natural to debate what happened. looking at causes, solutions, tactics and strategy. indeed, it would be odd, especially with conservatives, not to debate those kinds of things. one popular argument is to adjust to changing times to focus on alternative versions of the status quo rather than changing directions. to change policies and sometimes principles, to adapt to new political environments. another approach, one that we favor, is to lay out a better and clearer conservative vision of american society. the role of government, unlimited opportunity, of political self-government. rather than new principles, what we need are better arguments. and when you take those arguments -- we need to take those arguments to the american people. it is in that spirit that we welcome today's speaker to heritageouat mike lee is in th third year of his first term. that means more terms to follow. the first -- the third year of his first term as united states senator from the state of utah. his background is in the law and, actually, he began his bac
words wrong. before you walk out on the stage. he lost the election when he ran for governor two years later and did everything murphy is said. dwight eisenhower with robert montgomery. more importantly murphy who is also an officer had another protÉge at his famous ronald reagan. everything that reagan did, whether it's the reagan democrats, britain's use of media, everything he did he learn from george murphy, but he did it much better. murphy tutored reagan. reagan intern tutored charlton heston and the have the final person in that grouping would be arnold schwarzenegger who took media a step further, showing you could use 24/7 media which pushed aside as insignificant. he said was important as people who are bored with politics, more than 50% of the elect are at in presidential elections in something like 60% to 70% in gubernatorial elections don't care about politics. if i go on these shows and the reason they don't care about politics to the league of women voters to survey people who don't vote and find out why you don't vote. most are women and the number one reason is they d
. lincoln during the 1860's campaign and then after he was elected president. there were four months between the election and the inauguration, so many were coming to springfield, and one ended up being mr. lincoln's secretary of state. mary, being a host, she would have had to raise of cakes or a macaroon. from downtown springfield. we knew that they bought a lot of those macaroon pyramids. this is the double parlor, and these are the two nicest rooms of the house. there are marble top tables, the windows, gilded candlesticks. there is a what not shelf with a bust of mr. lee again on it. not everybody in the neighborhood could say that they had a bust of their husband in the living room. so this is a fancy place. this is where she wanted to show off. partyould have held her is in here. she would have been discussing mr. lincoln's political aspirations. at the front door, meeting mr. linking here, probably in the archway between the two rooms, may be picking up some refreshments, and then in the sitting room before going out again. but this was the seat of power in the house. mary was showca
, the gentleman called in about the radicals. let us not forget it was "occupy wall street" before the election. they were throwing bricks and chant ofcars with ta "viva revolution." let's look at both sides. host: the sun twitter -- -- this on twitter -- steve from savannah, georgia. caller: i am calling in because i am not only outraged at what happened but your first caller, she spoke with a nice british accents telling people how she was so patriotic when she took her oath of office in this country and people she looked around the room and she was the only one who belong here and so forth. basically saying that people who did not look like her did not belong here. -- this isis citizen a british citizen. if any citizen of that country immigrates to britain, people like curt treat them as if they do not belong there. britain colonizes those countries. about howing patriotic -- basically trying to tell people in this country that they should exclude certain people. because she is accepted hear other people do not belong here. i was really offended by her comments because i took an oath in this
spoke oquentthe election. the hispanic community voted 70% minds on the republican side that immigration was a issue that the time has come. that is what we will have a bill because 70% hispanics voted democratic. it is that they had a clearer from howthe fog faded important this issue was to the people in our country. i feel confident about how we go forward on immigration. i commend the eight senators for the work they did. of course it is a compromise. when i change things? of course, but i think that is i think a compromise is about. i am calling them gangs of eight -- the bipartisan team in the house, the have been working on this issue for an long time, and their proposals are very much like what is in the senate. we're pretty happy about the place is. do not get me wrong, it is not a bill i would have written or something that all our members are quick to embrace, because again, it is a compromise. as a compromise, it is the boldest, denominator, the best we can do, and it is very good. again my members will have their concerns about it and their complaints about it because it is
them. they think in the general election 4% of the people care most about this issue, even though 91% of the country disagrees with us, we might not pay a political price for it whereas we know the lobby--the gun lobby will make us pay a price for it. isn't that what is wrong with our structurally with the current democracy. >> of course that's what is wrong with it. weakening that lobby is a very important part of it. but also changing the rules of the senate is a part of it that has to meet that weakening halfway. and when you have these senators who are afraid to vote for something because of the grade they're going to get. max baucus when he said why he didn't vote for it, one word, montana. the nra and the crazy support of max baucus. i'm not going to say it's crazy to support max baucus because they got what they wanted but they're so supportive with money you understand why the senators vote in that way. you have to change the structure of the filibuster. noah is right with four democratic senators they only would have gotten to 59 but they shouldn't have to get past 59. they
enterprise who elected me. america is a nation of immigrants but republicans and democrats have failed to enforce the laws. we're not going to deport them. so let's secure the border. let's bring these people out to feel shadows. they will undergo a background check, they will pay a fine, th will start paying taxings. they won't qualify for federal benefits. we all wish we did not have this leaving things the way they are that is the real amnesty. we have to fix it. [speaking spanish] thank you. [applause] >> i thought i might go last to allow me to say i agree with everything that was said and sit down but jeff you're going to get that honor. i want to thank my colleagues up here showing me that the senate can work. it is going to take more for us to get this bill passed and it is incredibly impoortant for people of my state. the leadership of mccain and schumer throughout this process has been outstanding. it is everything i wish i could have seen from the first day i got here. when this bill is passed it will an affirmation of two great ideas. we're committed to the rule of law and
. >> there is a request or directive out there to take the steps so passengers call their elected officials to take them to take action. >> some of the busiest airports including new york and washington already experiencing delays and longer wait times for security. >> he says he was arrested for sticking up for the first and second amendment. 8th grader jair rotted mar come refused when a teacher told him to remove his nra shirt that says protect your rights. he faces charges of disrupting an educational process and officer. his father says it does not violate the dress code. >>> a florida father punched out an alligator that attacked his 6-year-old son. how the duo was getting ready to go canoeing that's when the child wandered away into the jaws of an 8 foot gator near their home. >> jabbed my arm and i couldn't get out. >> i ran into the water about waste deep and i had my son like this here because i didn't want to play tug of war with theal giert. i didn't want to get his arm ripped out. while i am doing that i am punching the alligator on top of his head. >> a good samaritan came in and helped st
time. in that in november when president elect came up here to washington to meet with president obama, shortly before his inaugural. it was a successful meeting. it is telling about the relationship between u.s. and mexico that the president is traveling to mexico in may to meet again with the president to discuss a broad range of issues. the second reason it is timely is because on the american side, we have not seen the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. is hot andtion bill heavy, front and center. ginsburg indid espagnole. shows, toe sunday talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. i think the guns may come out not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. states, nowunited japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance. into thebring nafta 21st c
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12